Lethe Press Books

The blog for Lethe Press Books. Lethe is an independent publishing house focusing on gay and lesbian fiction, poetry, and speculative fiction.

Review: Boys of Summer

llark:

Another nice review of Boys of Summer (edited by Steve Berman), and my story, Breakwater in the Summer Dark. Everyone seems to think I am a boy. 

(Source: llark)

FREE FICTION: "Firooz and His Brother" by Alex Jeffers

From Alex’s forthcoming  collection of wonder stories You Will Meet a Stranger Far from Home
coming from Lethe Press this July

Publisher’s Weekly Reviews Catherine Lundoff’s “Silver Moon”!

They say, “Deft humor, hints of romance, and well-constructed suspense leaven the occasional sturdy earnestness, while the rejection of toned hotties as the embodiment of supernatural power in favor of women whose lives have prepared them with the wisdom for their new role is refreshing.”

Read the rest

Releasing in May: It Takes Two by Elliott Mackle

February, 1949. Fort Myers, Florida. It started out to be such a nice day. But early morning gunfire at the Royal Plaza Motor Hotel changed all that. One white man is dead. One black man is dead. The white man’s widow has just crashed the investigation and is waving a gun around. Dan Ewing, who isn’t supposed to be there, barely escapes getting shot. Saving his bacon is Lee County detective Bud Wright. Dan and Bud are more than just fishing buddies. But that’s one secret of many in this small town. Dan is the manager of the Caloosa Hotel, a class act if you’re just passing through, but a provider of card games, call girls, mixed drinks and other special ”services” for members of the ultra-private Caloosa Club. This doesn’t sit well with everyone in town, including a wealthy car dealer, the KKK, and Bud Wright, despite the fact that he’s sleeping with Dan. But the car dealer is the dead white man, the black man is the husband of his wife’s former maid, and the sheriff, Bud’s boss, seems determined to steer the investigation off track. So what does the apparent murder-suicide have to do with the Caloosa? Former journalist Elliott Mackle takes this wonderfully realized ”why-done-it” to fascinating levels as he explores the various factions of a small southern town facing the giant implications of a rapidly changing society in the postwar years. IT TAKES TWO, Mackle’s first novel and a Lambda Literary Award finalist returns to print.

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Latest News from Lethe Press….

EVENT: Divining Divas editor Michael Montlack in NYC 4.28

This weekend Montlack is inviting friends and lovers of these magical women to join him in the release of his book Divining Divas. Next Saturday, April 28th starting at 9pm at elmo, join Montlack in the celebration of this tome dedicated to divas and the men that love them.

Here is Montlack’s poem about Stevie Nicks:

"And wouldn’t you love to love her?" -Stevie Nicks

       platforms

like a mare on thoroughbred legs: 

some towering foal

still teetering

on a previous life’s terrain 

        her rasp: 

those boot soles

scraping sandy gravel, 

lightly lapping

rain-softened leaves

        shawls

lending shape to a breezy ghostess

delighted by her own sheets, 

how they billow

       the pose

of white arms extended

as sheer capes unfold

sorrows, secrets, hiding places

for the invisible

        an icon: 

childless

fairy godmother

mothering

the fairy child

—Michael Montlack

Special subscription offer for ICARUS: The Magazine of Gay Speculative Fiction

Do you like speculative fiction? Enjoy the work of such award-winning writers as Richard Bowes, Sandra McDonald or Joel Lane? How about Alex Jeffers or Rod Santos? Do you like seeing a wide-range of voices depicting a variety of gay male characters? Serious fiction, articles and reviews?

Then ICARUS is for you!

Alas, my little magazine does not reach as many readers as I’d like. Which is a disappointment for the authors who I publish.

So, to remedy this, for today only, new subscribers can purchase a one-year subscription to the print edition (4 issues) for only $13!

Click here to take advantage of this offer!

Sneak peak of the cover of TOUCH OF THE SEA, edited by Steve Berman
Greek myths held that Oceanus to be a massive river surrounding the land. A Titan, son of sky and earth, he was depicted as a handsome, muscular man whose torso ended in a scaled tail. As the Olympians emerged, Oceanus retreated, his domain restricted to strange and dangerous shores, the realm of sailors’ fortunes and worries. So, too, are the eleven tales within the pages of The Touch of the Sea: fantastical, at times eerie, with sightings of mermen, water spirits, and sea beasts (even the fabled “living island,” the aspidochelone) as well as a smattering of pirates. What makes these stories memorable is that they reveal the masculinity of the sea, the taste of brine on another man’s lips.  Become mates with such award-winning authors as Joel Lane and Jeff Mann, seasoned storytellers ‘Nathan Burgoine, Chaz Brenchley, and Alex Jeffers—and a wide array of coxswains: Brandon Cracraft, Jonathan Harper, John Howard, Vincent Kovar, Matt Merendo, Damon Shaw—under the helm of editor Steve Berman.

Sneak peak of the cover of TOUCH OF THE SEA, edited by Steve Berman

Greek myths held that Oceanus to be a massive river surrounding the land. A Titan, son of sky and earth, he was depicted as a handsome, muscular man whose torso ended in a scaled tail. As the Olympians emerged, Oceanus retreated, his domain restricted to strange and dangerous shores, the realm of sailors’ fortunes and worries.

So, too, are the eleven tales within the pages of The Touch of the Sea: fantastical, at times eerie, with sightings of mermen, water spirits, and sea beasts (even the fabled “living island,” the aspidochelone) as well as a smattering of pirates. What makes these stories memorable is that they reveal the masculinity of the sea, the taste of brine on another man’s lips.

Become mates with such award-winning authors as Joel Lane and Jeff Mann, seasoned storytellers ‘Nathan Burgoine, Chaz Brenchley, and Alex Jeffers—and a wide array of coxswains: Brandon Cracraft, Jonathan Harper, John Howard, Vincent Kovar, Matt Merendo, Damon Shaw—under the helm of editor Steve Berman.
Now out….THE HEART’S HISTORY by Lewis DeSimone….
Critical Praise:

This is Edward—architect, friend, lover, mystery.  Everyone has their own Edward—a kaleidoscope of images struggling to define a man who has never let anyone get too close.  But now, Edward is dying, and all of his loved ones are desperate to understand him, to connect fully with him, before it’s too late.  In this beautiful and haunting novel, Lewis DeSimone, author of the acclaimed Chemistry, explores the hidden depths of love, and the struggle to maintain a balance between connection and individuality.  Set against the backdrop of a sea change in gay culture—when proud defiance struggles against a drive for assimilation—The Heart’s History paints a compelling portrait of a man and a community on the cusp of a critical transition.



Lewis DeSimone’s beautiful novel captures the many facets of contemporary gay life, from sharp humor, long-lasting friendships, and the urban club scene to the insecurities of aging, the uncertainties of romance, and the agonies of a loved one’s loss.  It also illuminates a difficult and inescapable truth:  we mortals are all elusive mysteries, all in the end unknowable, but that mystery is the very fuel of love.

—Jeff Mann, author of Fog: A Novel of Desire and Reprisal and Purgatory: A Novel of the Civil War



With admirable sensitivity, Lewis DeSimone reaches deep into a close community of friends to explore the textured lives of gay men, their urgencies haunted by the traumas and anxieties of the past, illuminated by their current (sometimes troubled) affinities and relationships. At the center of this circle is the endearing couple, Robert and Edward, their touching story a catalyst that allows those near them (including the reader) to consider the power of commitment, the grace of forgiveness.  The Heart’s History is a stunning portrait of love.

—Rigoberto González, author of The Mariposa Club and Butterfly Boy

 

Lewis DeSimone’s The Heart’s History is a novel of trouble and wonder. It moves in unexpected directions and looks into the complicated, real-life struggles that lesser writers tend to simplify or avoid. It is adult in its scope, and generous in its understanding of how loss changes us as both groups and individuals. As soon as I finished, I wanted to start reading all over again.

—Paul Lisicky, author of Lawnboy and The Burning House

 

Lewis DeSimone is a great writer. His prose is thoughtful, deep, layered and real. His characters are living. It’s about love and sex and AIDS, about human connection and the ultimate unknowability of another person. It’s about the slow assimilation of a larger gay culture that used to be more angry and badass. It’s a really good book written by a very skilled author.

—Michelle Tea, author of Valencia and Rose of No Man’s Land

 

In The Heart’s History Lewis DeSimone gives us a profoundly moving story about reaching out and pulling back, about intimacy and mystery, written in shapely and nuanced prose. Even better, it also reminds us of important truths about life, gay and otherwise:  that time changes everything, that love changes shape, and that friendship can change a world, if we let it. That makes it a book to read closely, with tenderness … and repeatedly.

—Peter Dubé, author of Hovering World and Subtle Bodies

Now out….THE HEART’S HISTORY by Lewis DeSimone….

Critical Praise:

This is Edward—architect, friend, lover, mystery.  Everyone has their own Edward—a kaleidoscope of images struggling to define a man who has never let anyone get too close.  But now, Edward is dying, and all of his loved ones are desperate to understand him, to connect fully with him, before it’s too late.  In this beautiful and haunting novel, Lewis DeSimone, author of the acclaimed Chemistry, explores the hidden depths of love, and the struggle to maintain a balance between connection and individuality.  Set against the backdrop of a sea change in gay culture—when proud defiance struggles against a drive for assimilation—The Heart’s History paints a compelling portrait of a man and a community on the cusp of a critical transition.

Lewis DeSimone’s beautiful novel captures the many facets of contemporary gay life, from sharp humor, long-lasting friendships, and the urban club scene to the insecurities of aging, the uncertainties of romance, and the agonies of a loved one’s loss.  It also illuminates a difficult and inescapable truth:  we mortals are all elusive mysteries, all in the end unknowable, but that mystery is the very fuel of love.

—Jeff Mann, author of Fog: A Novel of Desire and Reprisal and Purgatory: A Novel of the Civil War

With admirable sensitivity, Lewis DeSimone reaches deep into a close community of friends to explore the textured lives of gay men, their urgencies haunted by the traumas and anxieties of the past, illuminated by their current (sometimes troubled) affinities and relationships. At the center of this circle is the endearing couple, Robert and Edward, their touching story a catalyst that allows those near them (including the reader) to consider the power of commitment, the grace of forgiveness.  The Heart’s History is a stunning portrait of love.

—Rigoberto González, author of The Mariposa Club and Butterfly Boy

 

Lewis DeSimone’s The Heart’s History is a novel of trouble and wonder. It moves in unexpected directions and looks into the complicated, real-life struggles that lesser writers tend to simplify or avoid. It is adult in its scope, and generous in its understanding of how loss changes us as both groups and individuals. As soon as I finished, I wanted to start reading all over again.

—Paul Lisicky, author of Lawnboy and The Burning House

 

Lewis DeSimone is a great writer. His prose is thoughtful, deep, layered and real. His characters are living. It’s about love and sex and AIDS, about human connection and the ultimate unknowability of another person. It’s about the slow assimilation of a larger gay culture that used to be more angry and badass. It’s a really good book written by a very skilled author.

—Michelle Tea, author of Valencia and Rose of No Man’s Land

 

In The Heart’s History Lewis DeSimone gives us a profoundly moving story about reaching out and pulling back, about intimacy and mystery, written in shapely and nuanced prose. Even better, it also reminds us of important truths about life, gay and otherwise:  that time changes everything, that love changes shape, and that friendship can change a world, if we let it. That makes it a book to read closely, with tenderness … and repeatedly.

—Peter Dubé, author of Hovering World and Subtle Bodies

Edge reviews CRIMES ON LATIMER by DeMarco

Joseph R.G. DeMarco takes a look into the formative years of his gay detective character, Marco Fontana, in this teasing collection of short murder mysteries.

Read the rest of the review!